Browse Cases

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Yugoslav Student League protests Vietnam War, 1966-1968

Country
Serbia
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Croatia
Time period
Autumn, 1966 to April, 1968
Classification
Change
Cluster
Human Rights
Peace
Total points
5 out of 10 points
Name of researcher, and date dd/mm/yyyy
Sarah Gonzales, 24/03/2013

During the late 1960s, students around the world were visibly protesting and speaking out against injustices.  The Vietnam War made an especially large impact on young people.  Many students in the United States of America aggressively protested their own government's military intervention in Vietnam.  

Croatians protest closure of radio station (Radio 101), 1996

Country
Croatia
Time period
Noon 20 November, 1996 to Morning 21 November, 1996
Classification
Defense
Cluster
Democracy
Total points
10 out of 10 points
Name of researcher, and date dd/mm/yyyy
Matthew Heck, 28/11/2010

In the 20th century, Croatia existed in several different
incarnations. Until 1918, Croatia was part of Austria-Hungary, but with the
dissolution of the empire, Croatia instead cofounded Yugoslavia with other
Balkan states. However, like the Austria-Hungary Empire previously, this state
also fell apart with the end of World War II. For a brief time, Croatia existed
as an independent state. This period ended with the founding of the Second
Yugoslavia and the rise of communism. Croatia existed as this entity until 1991

Bosnian, Croatian, and Macedonian parents protest conscription of sons and civil war in Yugoslavia, 1991

Country
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Croatia
Macedonia
Serbia
Time period
August 27, 1991 to September, 1991
Classification
Change
Cluster
Peace
National/Ethnic Identity
Total points
4 out of 10 points
Name of researcher, and date dd/mm/yyyy
Max Rennebohm 20/04/2011

In the early 1990s the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (SFRY) was a confederation made up of six constituent republics: Croatia, Slovenia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Macedonia, Montenegro, and Serbia.  However, the ethnic groups from each of these regions were spread throughout the SFRY, which blurred the borders between the constituent republics and made politics in each region much more complicated.  For instance, Bosnia-Herzegovina was 44% Bosnian Muslims, 31% Serbs, and 17% Croats.  In order to provide federal representation to each constituent republic, the leadership