Student Living Wage Movement (late 1990s - mid 2000s)

Georgetown University students catalyze win for living wage for university workers, 2001-2006

Student Living Wage Movement (late 1990s - mid 2000s)
 

The Georgetown Solidarity Committee (GSC) formed at Georgetown University in 1996 to support workers' rights. In the fall of 2001, a group of students, headed by the GSC, formed the Living Wage Coalition (LWC) in order to guarantee University workers an income to meet their subsistence needs. The students held meetings on how to take action and organized breakfast events with workers to hear their grievances and concerns. By 2002, the administration agreed to raise the minimum wage of workers directly employed by the university to $10.25 per

Swarthmore students and staff campaign for a living wage, 2000-2004

Student Living Wage Movement (late 1990s - mid 2000s)
 

Swarthmore College, a small liberal arts college just outside of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, had long been respected as an institution with a strong commitment to social justice. While the College had pioneered such practices as co-education and comprehensive financial aid, by 2000 many College staff—including those in the environmental and dining services departments—were paid just above poverty levels for Delaware County, where the College and the majority of its workers reside. In the fall of 2000, a group of students began to talk with staff about the College’s employment practices.

Johns Hopkins University community demand a living wage for campus and health system employees, 1996-2000

Student Living Wage Movement (late 1990s - mid 2000s)
 

In December 1994, the city of Baltimore passed a city ordinance mandating that employees of companies receiving city contracts be paid a living wage (defined as a wage that keeps a family of four above the federally determined poverty level adjusted yearly for cost of living increases and inflation).

University of Miami janitors campaign for economic justice, 2005-2006

Student Living Wage Movement (late 1990s - mid 2000s)
 

In 2006, non-unionized janitors at the University of Miami earned as little as $6.40 an hour and received no health insurance. Demanding higher wages and better working conditions, these janitors of mostly Haitian and Cuban descent began a campaign against the University of Miami with leadership from the Service Employees International Union (SEIU).

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