Arab Awakening (2011)

Bahrainis protest for democracy, February-March 2011

Arab Awakening (2011)
 

Inspired by the protests in Egypt and Tunisia in 2011, Bahrainis rose up against the monarchy in February and March of 2011. Initiated by activists and propelled by the “February 14th Revolution in Bahrain” Facebook group, the protests had clear goals: disband the Bahraini National Assembly, abrogate the current constitution, and form a Constituent Assembly to draft a new constitution. They demanded the new constitution stipulate that an elected parliament hold legislative authority and that an elected Prime Minister exercise executive authority.

Egyptian Muslims create human barriers to protect Coptic Egyptians and stand against religious militancy and government inaction, 2011

Arab Awakening (2011)
 

On New Year’s Eve, in 2010, Islamic militants attacked the Saints Church in Alexandria, raising tensions and concerns about religious violence in Egypt. The attack was only the most recent occurrence of religious violence and militancy in Egypt. Many Egyptians perceived the issue as an epidemic, as well as the failings of the Egyptian government to ensure the right to freedom of religious beliefs. The growing resentment of government inaction and lack of representation led to the Egyptian majority taking matters into their own hands through a campaign to

Omanis make economic gains, press for democracy 2011

Arab Awakening (2011)
 

The Arab Awakening came to the Middle Eastern country of Oman with a peaceful protest in the capital Muscat on 17 January, 2011. This campaign consisted of several groups that worked towards both individual and collective goals. The campaigners had many demands including: government reforms, an increased minimum wage, lower unemployment rates, and higher education rates.

Maldivians demand resignation of the president, 2011

Arab Awakening (2011)
 

The Republic of the Maldives is a chain of islands in the Indian Ocean southwest of Sri Lanka. The country is threatened by becoming completely covered by the sea because of climate change.

Moroccan youth protest for constitutional reform, 2011

Arab Awakening (2011)
 

Morocco is a constitutional monarchy with an elected parliament. Political reforms in the 1990s expanded parliamentary power in 1992 and 1996, and in 1996 a bicameral legislature consisting of two chambers was established. On his accession to the throne in 1999, King Mohammed VI promised to enact a series of reforms democratizing the monarchy, but this was seen as largely unfulfilled. King Mohammad VI succeeded his father, King Hassan, who had ruled for thirty-seven years. Hassan’s rule, known as the “Years of Lead,” was largely marked by violence against state dissidents.

Yemenis oust Saleh regime (Yemen Revolution), 2011-2012

Arab Awakening (2011)
 

In January 2011, in the wake of the Tunisian revolution and in the midst of the Egyptian revolution, Yemeni students and youth began a yearlong revolution to oust the regime of Ali Abdullah Saleh, president for the past thirty years. This revolution did not come without great cost. More than 2,000 people were killed (including protesters, military defectors and children) and more than 22,000 people were wounded.

Tunisians overthrow dictator and demand political and economic reform (Jasmine Revolution), 2010-2011

Arab Awakening (2011)
 

Over the past several decades, high unemployment, high food prices, and widespread poverty have characterized much of Tunisia. Government corruption and a paucity of political freedoms have also painted its landscape, making it exceedingly difficult for Tunisians to express dissent against the ruling Constitutional Democratic Rally (RCD) party. However, on 17 December 2010, 26-year-old Mohammed Bouazizi doused himself in paint thinner and set himself on fire in front of the Sidi Bouzid municipal office in response to the confiscation of his produce stand, his violent treatment a

Egyptians bring down dictatorship of Hosni Mubarak, 2011

Arab Awakening (2011)
 

Beginning in 1981, Hosni Mubarak ruled Egypt for over twenty-nine years. Though he ran for
presidential reelection several times, elections were marked by widespread
fraud, and opposing politicians were legally prohibited from running against
Mubarak until 2005. Virtually all key officials in government were from
Mubarak's National Democratic Party (NDP). Mubarak constructed a vast security
apparatus to control public dissent; in the 1990s, citizens would only whisper
his name for fear of reprisal. For his entire tenure as president, Egypt was in

Syrian women block highway, win back captive men, 2011

Arab Awakening (2011)
 


Jordanians protest for democratic and economic reform, 2011

Arab Awakening (2011)
 

Beginning in December of 2010, massive protests against hunger and joblessness manifested all over the country of Tunisia. Similar violent protests erupted in Algeria over food costs. Consequently, on January 12, 2011, the Jordanian government made attempts to prevent similar events from happening; the government announced a plan worth $169 million dollars to control the price of essential resources and to spur job creation.

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